https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-48315979

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Image caption Ed Bridges has had his image captured twice by South Wales Police AFR technology. The first major legal challenge to police use of automated facial recognition surveillance begins in Cardiff later. Ed Bridges, whose image was taken while he was shopping, says weak regulation means AFR breaches human rights. The civil rights group Liberty says current use of the tool is equivalent to the unregulated taking of DNA or fingerprints without consent. South Wales Police defends the tool but has not commented on the case. In December 2017, Ed Bridges was having a perfectly normal day. "I popped out of the office to do a bit of Christmas shopping and on the main pedestrian shopping st... Full story

21 May

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